• A Christmas Carol
  • A Christmas Carol
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A Christmas Carol

Introduced by Anthony Horowitz

Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)

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A Christmas Carol

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Beschreibung

Details

Einband

Taschenbuch

Altersempfehlung

10 - 12 Jahr(e)

Erscheinungsdatum

07.08.2008

Verlag

Penguin Books Ltd

Seitenzahl

160

Beschreibung

Details

Einband

Taschenbuch

Altersempfehlung

10 - 12 Jahr(e)

Erscheinungsdatum

07.08.2008

Verlag

Penguin Books Ltd

Seitenzahl

160

Maße (L/B/H)

17,7/12,8/1,5 cm

Gewicht

107 g

Sprache

Englisch

ISBN

978-0-14-132452-4

Weitere Bände von Puffin Classics

Unsere Kundinnen und Kunden meinen

4.2

5 Bewertungen

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Classic for a reason

Stephanie aus Neuenhof am 02.02.2023

Bewertungsnummer: 1871753

Bewertet: Buch (Gebundene Ausgabe)

Though, the concept of looking back and/or onto your own life, either through dreams or some supernatural way, isn’t entirely new to me it’s still one of the concepts that is so endlessly rewarding when done well. And the way Charles Dickens wrote this is done very well! It’s about Ebenezer Scrooge who has misgivings about nearly everything and everyone and is a very unpleasant fellow to have around in general. The story plays during Christmas time which is, or ought to be, a festive time filled with joy, happiness and love. Yet to Scrooge this particular season can’t pass quickly enough. What with people wanting to rip off his money for purposes unbefitting of his acceptance seeing that there are organisations and institutions which are still operating to care for the poor and destitude. Why then did one have to provide even more? It turns out, all he needed in order to see what really mattered in life was to have him be visited by his late business partner (with whom he had shared his dismal mood) who would help him see, would help him understand. I enjoyed this story overall, but most of all the author’s take on morality and his writing style. I’m just a sucker for the way one wrote and spoke all these years ago. If you would like to try a classic but are intimidated by the thick and seemingly challenging books like Anna Karenina, etc. then this short story might be for you - Hugh Grant does an excellent job at narrating it, if audiobooks are more your thing
Melden

Classic for a reason

Stephanie aus Neuenhof am 02.02.2023
Bewertungsnummer: 1871753
Bewertet: Buch (Gebundene Ausgabe)

Though, the concept of looking back and/or onto your own life, either through dreams or some supernatural way, isn’t entirely new to me it’s still one of the concepts that is so endlessly rewarding when done well. And the way Charles Dickens wrote this is done very well! It’s about Ebenezer Scrooge who has misgivings about nearly everything and everyone and is a very unpleasant fellow to have around in general. The story plays during Christmas time which is, or ought to be, a festive time filled with joy, happiness and love. Yet to Scrooge this particular season can’t pass quickly enough. What with people wanting to rip off his money for purposes unbefitting of his acceptance seeing that there are organisations and institutions which are still operating to care for the poor and destitude. Why then did one have to provide even more? It turns out, all he needed in order to see what really mattered in life was to have him be visited by his late business partner (with whom he had shared his dismal mood) who would help him see, would help him understand. I enjoyed this story overall, but most of all the author’s take on morality and his writing style. I’m just a sucker for the way one wrote and spoke all these years ago. If you would like to try a classic but are intimidated by the thick and seemingly challenging books like Anna Karenina, etc. then this short story might be for you - Hugh Grant does an excellent job at narrating it, if audiobooks are more your thing

Melden

Bad quality print

Bewertung aus Unterägeri am 11.12.2021

Bewertungsnummer: 1621714

Bewertet: Buch (Taschenbuch)

It looks a lot better online. In reality it is a poor quality print. Will not order here again.
Melden

Bad quality print

Bewertung aus Unterägeri am 11.12.2021
Bewertungsnummer: 1621714
Bewertet: Buch (Taschenbuch)

It looks a lot better online. In reality it is a poor quality print. Will not order here again.

Melden

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A Christmas Carol

von Charles Dickens

4.2

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L. Himstedt

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5/5

The Christmas Classic

Bewertet: Buch (Taschenbuch)

We all know the story of Ebenezer Scrouge and his aversion to Christmas! This is such a heart-warming classic and it is actually quite easy to read, although it is by Dickens! I read this last year and want to make it a little Christmas tradition to reread it every Christmas season!!
5/5

The Christmas Classic

Bewertet: Buch (Taschenbuch)

We all know the story of Ebenezer Scrouge and his aversion to Christmas! This is such a heart-warming classic and it is actually quite easy to read, although it is by Dickens! I read this last year and want to make it a little Christmas tradition to reread it every Christmas season!!

L. Himstedt
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A Christmas Carol

von Charles Dickens

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MARLEY was dead: to begin with. There is no doubt whatever about that. The register of his burial was signed by the clergyman, the clerk, the undertaker, and the chief mourner. Scrooge signed it: and Scrooge's name was good upon 'Change, for anything he chose to put his hand to. Old Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Mind! I don't mean to say that I know, of my own knowledge, what there is particularly dead about a door-nail. I might have been inclined, myself, to regard a coffin-nail as the deadest piece of ironmongery in the trade. But the wisdom of our ancestors is in the simile; and my unhallowed hands shall not disturb it, or the Country's done for. You will therefore permit me to repeat, emphatically, that Marley was as dead as a door-nail.

Scrooge knew he was dead? Of course he did. How could it be otherwise? Scrooge and he were partners for I don't know how many years. Scrooge was his sole executor, his sole administrator, his sole assign, his sole residuary legatee, his sole friend and sole mourner. And even Scrooge was not so dreadfully cut up by the sad event, but that he was an excellent man of business on the very day of the funeral, and solemnised it with an undoubted bargain.

The mention of Marley's funeral brings me back to the point I started from. There is no doubt that Marley was dead. This must be distinctly understood, or nothing wonderful can come of the story I am going to relate. If we were not perfectly convinced that Hamlet's Father died before the play began, there would be nothing more remarkable in his taking a stroll at night, in an easterly wind, upon his own ramparts, than there would be in any other middle-aged gentleman rashly turning out after dark in a breezy spot-say Saint Paul's Churchyard for instance-literally to astonish his son's weak mind.

Scrooge never painted out Old Marley's name. There it stood, years afterwards, above the warehouse door: Scrooge and Marley. The firm was known as Scrooge and Marley. Sometimes people new to the business called Scrooge Scrooge, and sometimes Marley, but he answered to both names: it was all the same to him.

Oh! but he was a tight-fisted hand at the grindstone, Scrooge! a squeezing, wrenching, grasping, scraping, clutching, covetous old sinner! Hard and sharp as flint, from which no steel had ever struck out generous fire; secret, and self-contained, and solitary as an oyster. The cold within him froze his old features, nipped his pointed nose, shrivelled his cheek, stiffened his gait; made his eyes red, his thin lips blue; and spoke out shrewdly in his grating voice. A frosty rime was on his head, and on his eyebrows, and his wiry chin. He carried his own low temperature always about with him; he iced his office in the dog-days; and didn't thaw it one degree at Christmas.

External heat and cold had little influence on Scrooge. No warmth could warm, nor wintry weather chill him. No wind that blew was bitterer than he, no falling snow was more intent upon its purpose, no pelting rain less open to entreaty. Foul weather didn't know where to have him. The heaviest rain, and snow, and hail, and sleet, could boast of the advantage over him in only one respect. They often 'came down' handsomely, and Scrooge never did.

Nobody ever stopped him in the street to say, with gladsome looks, 'My dear Scrooge, how are you? when will you come to see me?' No beggars implored him to bestow a trifle, no children asked him what it was 'oclock, no man or woman ever once in all his life inquired the way to such and such a place, of Scrooge. Even the blindmen's dogs appeared to know him; and when they saw him coming on, would tug their owners into doorways and up courts; and then would wag their tails as though they said, 'no eye at all is better than an evil eye, dark master!'

But what did Scrooge care? It was the very thing he liked. To edge his way along the crowded paths of life, warning all human sympathy to
  • A Christmas Carol
  • A Christmas Carol