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The Making of a Manager

What to Do When Everyone Looks to You

Julie Zhuo

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Beschreibung

Rated Amazon's #1 Best Business Book of the Year So Far!

"I've seen so many people thrust into management in high-growth companies with so little guidance. From now on, I will hand them this book. Its practical wisdom is immediately useful for the newly minted manager—and us old ones."

—Ev Williams, CEO of Medium and co-founder of Twitter

“Julie Zhuo had to learn to be a manager fast, as her role kept expanding in the hyper-growth environment of a successful Silicon Valley start-up. In 
The Making of a Manager, she shares what she learned—often, the hard way. She combines cutting-edge analysis of how organizations work with engaging and accessible examples of how theory plays out in real life, with stories of what she did right and wrong.”
 
—Gretchen Rubin, author of The Happiness Project
 
“I wish I'd had this book when I started managing a team at Instagram. Julie covers the full range of becoming a manager, from your first meetings with your team to accomplishing huge goals together.”


—Mike Krieger, co-founder of Instagram

"Every business book I read as a consultant and later a CEO was written by a man. Julie brings an entirely fresh perspective on leadership as a brilliant hacker, first-generation American, and young mother. This book is everything Silicon Valley appreciates in Julie: humble, inspiring, and whip-smart." 

—Leila Janah, CEO and founder of Samasource and LXMI and author of Give Work


"At startups, individuals asked to manage are rarely set-up for success. Julie Zhuo gives new managers the tools they need to help their people and company win."

—Sam Altman, president of Y Combinator and co-chairman of OpenAI

"Are you a new manager? Are you a little scared? Fear not. Julie Zhuo is here to help. She took on a manager position at one of the biggest start-ups of our generation before she felt quite ready, but she grew into the job. And now she's here to guide you as you grow into the job. This book will get you on the right track and keep you there.”

—Daniel H. Pink, author of When and Drive

"As an entrepreneur and CEO, I've read all of the business books, but this is one I'll be turning to again and again as a reference for how to help my team thrive. It's a leadership manifesto for a startup, global mega-company, or anything in between.”

—Brit Morin, founder and CEO of Brit + Co

 

"Julie is like that friend giving you some much-needed tips over coffee—her style cuts through industry jargon and gets at the heart of how to lead with confidence and help your team do their best work." 

—Nir Eyal, author of Hooked

 

"
The Making of a Manager is an excellent, approachable and comprehensive guide for those making the transition into management. This is something we'd give out to new managers at Slack and it could very well set a new standard for new managers."

—Stewart Butterfield, CEO and co-founder of Slack

"Julie does an incredible job simplifying the role of a manager. She pulls you in with all the awkward, funny and tough moments of being a first time manager, and then takes you on an engaging journey. She sets forth a crystal clear playbook of how to drive impact and get the most out of your teams. If you’re a first time manager, you’ll learn how to hit the ground running, and experienced managers will level-up their game!" 

—Logan Green, CEO and co-founder of Lyft 

"I've seen so many people thrust into management in high-growth companies with so little guidance. From now on, I will hand them this book. Its practical wisdom is immediately useful for the newly minted manager - and us old ones."
-Ev Williams, CEO of Medium and Co-founder of Twitter

"Julie Zhuo had to learn to be a manager fast, as her role kept expanding in the hyper-growth environment of a successful Silicon Valley start-up. In The Making of a Manager, she shares what she learned-often, the hard way. She combines cutting-edge analysis of how organizations work with engaging and accessible examples of how theory plays out in real life, with stories of what she did right and wrong."
-Gretchen Rubin, New York Times bestselling author of The Happiness Project

"I wish I'd had this book when I started managing a team at Instagram. Julie covers the full range of becoming a manager, from your first meetings with your team to accomplishing huge goals together."
-Mike Krieger, Co-Founder of Instagram

"Every business book I read as a consultant and later a CEO was written by a man. Julie brings an entirely fresh perspective on leadership as a brilliant hacker, first-generation American, and young mother. This book is everything Silicon Valley appreciates in Julie: humble, inspiring, and whip-smart."
-Leila Janah, CEO and Founder of Samasource and LXMI and author of Give Work

"At startups, individuals asked to manage are rarely set-up for success. Julie Zhuo gives new managers the tools they need to help their people and company win."
-Sam Altman, President of YCombinator and Co-chairman of OpenAI

"Are you a new manager? Are you a little scared? Fear not. Julie Zhuo is here to help. She took on a manager position at one of the biggest start-ups of our generation before she felt quite ready, but she grew into the job. And now she's here to guide you as you grow into the job. By focusing on three big leadership themes-- Purpose, People, and Process -- she puts the emphasis right where it should be for the greatest success and satisfaction. This book will get you on the right track and keep you there."
-Daniel H. Pink, author of When and Drive

"As an entrepreneur and CEO, I've read ALL of the business books, but this is one I'll be turning to again and again as a reference for how to help my team thrive. It's a leadership manifesto for a startup, global mega-company, or anything in-between."
-Brit Morin, Founder and CEO of Brit + Co

"Julie is like that friend giving you some much-needed tips over coffee-her style cuts through industry jargon and gets at the heart of how to lead with confidence and help your team do their best work."
-Nir Eyal, author of Hooked

"When you're first made a manager, typically two things are true. One, you really don't want to be like one of those bad managers you've suffered under. And two, you've got no map on how to avoid becoming one of those self-same bad managers. But now you do. Use this wise, practical book to master purpose, people and process and speed towards being a great manager right from the start."
-Michael Bungay Stanier, author of the WSJ-bestseller The Coaching Habit

"The Making of a Manager is an excellent, approachable and comprehensive guide for those making the transition into management. This is something we'd give out to new managers at Slack and it could very well set a new standard for new managers."
-Stewart Butterfield, CEO and Co-founder of Slack

"Julie does an incredible job simplifying the role of a manager. She pulls you in with all the awkward, funny and tough moments of being a first time manager, and then takes you on an engaging journey. She sets forth a crystal clear playbook of how to drive impact and get the most out of your teams. If you're a first time manager, you'll learn how to hit the ground running, and experienced managers will level-up their game!"
-Logan Green, CEO and Co-founder of Lyft

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 288
Erscheinungsdatum 19.03.2019
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-525-54042-7
Verlag Penguin LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 20,8/13,6/2,2 cm
Gewicht 258 g
Verkaufsrang 5127

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  • Artikelbild-0
  • Introduction

    Great Managers Are Made, Not Born

    I remember the meeting when my manager asked me to become a manager.

    It was unexpected, like going for your daily run and tripping over a pirate chest. Oh, I thought, how intriguing.

    We were sitting in a ten-person conference room, kitty-corner from each other. "Our team is growing," my manager explained. "We need another manager, and you get along with everyone. What do you think?"

    I was twenty-five, working at a start-up. All that I knew of management could be neatly summarized into two words, meetings and PROMOTION. I mean, this was a promotion, wasn't it? Everyone knows this conversation was the equivalent of Harry Potter getting a visit from Hagrid on a dark and stormy night, the first step in an adventurous and fulfilling career. I wasn't about to turn down that kind of invitation.

    So I said yes.

    It was only later, walking out of the room, that I thought about the details of what she had said. I got along with everyone. Surely there was more to management than that. How much more? I was about to find out.

    -

    I remember my first meeting with a direct report.

    I arrived five minutes past our scheduled time, in a rush and flustered by my lateness. This is a terrible start, I thought to myself. I could see him through the windowed door of the conference room-the same one I had met my manager in previously-eyes glued to his phone. Just a day earlier, we had both been designers on the same team, sitting in our adjacent pods, working on our respective projects while lobbing rapid-fire design feedback across the aisle. Then the announcement was made, and now I was his manager.

    I'm not nervous, I told myself. We're going to have a great conversation. About what, I wasn't entirely sure. I just wanted this meeting to feel normal, like it had yesterday and the day before that. If he didn't love the fact that I was his manager, then at the very least I wanted him to be cool with it.

    I'm not nervous.

    I walked in. He glanced up from his phone, and I'll never forget the expression on his face. It had all the surliness of a teenager forced to attend his ten-year-old cousin's Pokémon-themed birthday party.

    "Hi," I said, trying to keep my voice level. "So, uh, what are you working on right now?"

    His scowl only deepened, settling in like a bear for the winter. I could feel the sweat starting to form on my face, the hot rush of blood pounding in my ears.

    I wasn't a better designer than this guy. I wasn't smarter or more experienced. The look on his face alone was enough to dispel me of any notion that he'd "be cool" with the fact that I was his manager. The message was as clear as if it had been written in giant black Sharpie:

    You have no idea what you're doing.

    At that moment, I felt he was absolutely right.

    -

    Three years later, after that fateful conversation with my manager, my role shifted again. Our design team had almost doubled in size since I started. Having made it through my first few years at a hyper-growth start-up, I thought I was used to change. I was no stranger to dealing with the firsts or rolling with the punches.

    Still, I was unprepared for just how much the new manager role would stretch me. For one thing, I was managing product designers, a discipline I didn't even know existed before I arrived at the company. For another, the responsibilities of managing people and the way they worked together felt like an enormous leap from creating user interfaces or writing code. In those early months and years, everything felt new and uncomfortable.

    I remember my first time interviewing someone for my team. Even though I was clearly the one with the upper hand-I asked the questions, I decided how the conversation should flow, I selected hire or no hire at the end of the day-my hands were shaking for the entire forty-five minutes.