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Digital Minimalism

Choosing a Focused Life in a Noisy World

“Cal Newport’s
Digital Minimalism is the best book I’ve read in some time about our fraught relationship with technology... If you’re looking for a blueprint to guide you as you liberate yourself from the shackles of email, social networks, smartphones, and screens, let this book be your guide."
—Adam Alter, author of Irresistible

 

“I challenge you not to devour this wonderful book in one sitting. I certainly did, and I started applying Cal’s ideas to my own life immediately.”
—Greg McKeown, author of Essentialism

 

“You’re not the user, you’re the product. Hang up, log off, and tune in to a different way to be in the world. Bravo, Cal. Smart advice for good people.” 
—Seth Godin, author of This is Marketing
 

“This book is an urgent call to action for anyone serious about being in command of their own life.” 
–Ryan Holiday, author of The Obstacle is the Way

 

“Cal Newport has discovered a cure for the techno-exhaustion that plagues our always-on, digitally caffeinated culture.”
—Joshua Fields Millburn, The Minimalists

 

“I hope that everyone who owns a mobile phone and has been wondering where their time goes gets a chance to absorb the ideas in this book. It’s amazing how the same strategy can work for both financial success and mental well-being: Put more energy into what makes you happy, and ruthlessly strip away the things that don’t.”
—Peter Adeney, aka Mr. Money Mustache

“Cal’s call for meaningful and engaged interactions is just what the world needs right now.”
 —Daniel Levitin, author of The Organized Mind

"What a timely and useful book! It's neither hysterical nor complacent - a workable guide to being thoughtful about digital media. It's already made me rethink some of my media use in a considered way. " 
—Naomi Alderman, New York Times bestselling author of 
The Power

“Digital Minimalism is a welcome invitation to reconsider how we want to use our screens rather than letting the screens (and the billionaires behind them) make the call.”
–KJ Dell'Antonia, author of How to be a Happier Parent


"Simple, insightful, and actionable, this philosophy provides a sorely needed framework for thriving in the digital age. It will transform many lives for the better, including my own." 
—Ryder Carroll, New York Times bestselling author of The Bullet Journal Method
Rezension
"Cal Newport's Digital Minimalism is the best book I've read in some time about our fraught relationship with technology... If you're looking for a blueprint to guide you as you liberate yourself from the shackles of email, social networks, smartphones, and screens, let this book be your guide." -Adam Alter, author of Irresistible

"I challenge you not to devour this wonderful book in one sitting. I certainly did, and I started applying Cal's ideas to my own life immediately." -Greg McKeown, author of Essentialism

"You're not the user, you're the product. Hang up, log off, and tune in to a different way to be in the world. Bravo, Cal. Smart advice for good people." -Seth Godin, author of This is Marketing

"This book is an urgent call to action for anyone serious about being in command of their own life." -Ryan Holiday, author of The Obstacle is the Way

"Cal Newport has discovered a cure for the techno-exhaustion that plagues our always-on, digitally caffeinated culture." -Joshua Fields Millburn, The Minimalists

"I hope that everyone who owns a mobile phone and has been wondering where their time goes gets a chance to absorb the ideas in this book. It's amazing how the same strategy can work for both financial success and mental well-being: Put more energy into what makes you happy, and ruthlessly strip away the things that don't." -Peter Adeney, aka Mr. Money Mustache

"Cal's call for meaningful and engaged interactions is just what the world needs right now." -Daniel Levitin, author of The Organized Mind

"What a timely and useful book! It's neither hysterical nor complacent - a workable guide to being thoughtful about digital media. It's already made me rethink some of my media use in a considered way. " -Naomi Alderman, NYT bestselling author of The Power
Portrait
Cal Newport is an associate professor of computer science at Georgetown University and the author of six books, including
Deep Work and
So Good They Can't Ignore You. You won't find him on Twitter, Facebook, or Instagram, but you can often find him at home with his family in Washington, DC, or writing essays for his popular website calnewport.com.
… weiterlesen
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  • Introduction

    In September 2016, the influential blogger and commentator Andrew Sullivan wrote a 7,000-word essay for New York magazine titled, "I Used to be a Human Being." Its subtitle was alarming: "An endless bombardment of news and gossip and images has rendered us manic information addicts. It broke me. It might break you, too."

    The article was widely shared. I'll admit, however, that when I first read it, I didn't fully comprehend Sullivan's warning. I'm one of the few members of my generation to never have a social media account, and tend not to spend much time web surfing. As a result, my phone plays a relatively minor role in my life-a fact that places me outside the mainstream experience this article addressed. In other words, I knew that the innovations of the Internet Age were playing an increasingly intrusive role in many people's lives, but I didn't have a visceral understanding of what this meant. That is, until everything changed.

    Earlier in 2016, I published a book titled Deep Work. It was about the underappreciated value of intense focus and how the professional world's emphasis on distracting communication tools was holding people back from producing their best work. As my book found an audience, I began to hear from more and more of my readers. Some sent me messages, while others cornered me after public appearances-but many of them asked the same question: What about their personal lives? They agreed with my arguments about office distractions, but as they then explained, they were arguably even more distressed by the way new technologies seemed to be draining meaning and satisfaction from their time spent outside of work. This caught my attention and tumbled me unexpectedly into a crash course on the promises and perils of modern digital life.

    Almost everyone I spoke to believed in the power of the internet, and recognized that it can and should be a force that improves their lives. They didn't necessarily want to give up Google Maps, or abandon Instagram, but they also felt as though their current relationship with technology was unsustainable-to the point that if something doesn't change soon, they'd break, too.

    A common term I heard in these conversations about modern digital life was exhaustion. It's not that any one app or website was particularly bad when considered in isolation. The issue was the overall impact of having so many different shiny baubles pulling so insistently at their attention and manipulating their mood. Their problem with this frenzied activity is less about its details than the fact that it's increasingly beyond peoples' control. Few want to spend so much time online, but these tools have a way of cultivating behavioral addictions. The urge to check Twitter or refresh Reddit becomes a nervous twitch that shatters uninterrupted time into shards too small to support the presence necessary for an intentional life.

    As I discovered in my subsequent research, and will argue in the next chapter, some of these addictive properties are accidental (few predicted the extent to which text messaging could command your attention), while many are quite purposeful (compulsive use is the foundation for many social media business plans). But whatever its source, this irresistible attraction to screens is leading people to feel as though they're ceding more and more of their autonomy when it comes to deciding how they direct their attention. No one, of course, signed up for this loss of control.

    They downloaded the apps and signed up for the networks for good reasons, only to discover, with grim irony, that these services were beginning to undermine the very values that made them appealing in the first place: They joined Facebook to stay in touch with friends across the country, and then end up unable to maintain an uninterrupted conversation with the friend sitting across the table.

    I also learned about the negative impact of unrestr
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 304
Erscheinungsdatum 05.02.2019
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-525-54287-2
Verlag Penguin LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 21/14,1/2,5 cm
Gewicht 274 g
Verkaufsrang 4388
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
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