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The Rainmaker

A Novel

It's summer in Memphis. The sweat is sticking to Rudy Baylor's shirt and creditors are nipping at his heels. Once he had aspirations of breezing through law school and punching his ticket to the good life. Now he doesn't have a job or a prayer...except for one: an insurance dispute that leaves a family devastated and opens the door for a lawsuit, if Rudy can find a way to file it.

By the time Rudy gets to court, a heavyweight corporate defense team is there to meet him. And suddenly he's in over his head, plunged into a nightmare of lies and legal maneuverings. A case that started small is exploding into a thunderous million-dollar war of nerves, skill and outright violence--a fight that could cost one young lawyer his life, or turn him into the biggest rainmaker in the land....
Rezension
"Great fun to read...The complex plotting is Grisham's major accomplishment."-Los Angeles Times

"A taut and terrific page-turner."-Entertainment Weekly
Portrait
JOHN GRISHAM is the author of
Skipping Christmas,
A Painted House,
The Brethren,
The
Testament,
The Street Lawyer,
The Partner,
The Runaway Jury,
The Rainmaker, The Chamber,
The Client,
The Pelican Brief,
The Firm, and
A Time to Kill.

From the Trade Paperback edition.
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  • CHAPTER ONE

    MY DECISION to become a lawyer was irrevocably sealed when I realized my father hated the legal profession. I was a young teenager, clumsy, embarrassed by my awkwardness, frustrated with life, horrified of puberty, about to be shipped off to a military school by my father for insubordination. He was an ex-Marine who believed boys should live by the crack of the whip. I'd developed a quick tongue and an aversion to discipline, and his solution was simply to send me away. It was years before I forgave him.

    He was also an industrial engineer who worked seventy hours a week for a company that made, among many other items, ladders. Because by their very nature ladders are dangerous devices, his company became a frequent target of lawsuits. And because he handled design, my father was the favorite choice to speak for the company in depositions and trials. I can't say that I blame him for hating lawyers, but I grew to admire them because they made his life so miserable. He'd spend eight hours haggling with them, then hit the martinis as soon as he walked in the door. No hellos. No hugs. No dinner. Just an hour or so of continuous bitching while he slugged down four martinis then passed out in his battered recliner. One trial lasted three weeks, and when it ended with a large verdict against the company my mother called a doctor and they hid him in a hospital for a month.

    The company later went broke, and of course all blame was directed at the lawyers. Not once did I hear any talk that maybe a trace of mismanagement could in any way have contributed to the bankruptcy.

    Liquor became his life, and he became depressed. He went years without a steady job, which really ticked me off because I was forced to wait tables and deliver pizza so I could claw my way through college. I think I spoke to him twice during the four years of my undergraduate studies. The day after I learned I had been accepted to law school, I proudly returned home with this great news. Mother told me later he stayed in bed for a week.

    Two weeks after my triumphant visit, he was changing a lightbulb in the utility room when (I swear this is true) a ladder collapsed and he fell on his head. He lasted a year in a coma in a nursing home before someone mercifully pulled the plug.

    Several days after the funeral, I suggested the possibility of a lawsuit, but Mother was just not up to it. Also, I've always suspected he was partially inebriated when he fell. And he was earning nothing, so under our tort system his life had little economic value.

    My mother received a grand total of fifty thousand dollars in life insurance, and remarried badly. He's a simple sort, my stepfather, a retired postal clerk from Toledo, and they spend most of their time square dancing and traveling in a Winnebago. I keep my distance. Mother didn't offer me a dime of the money, said it was all she had to face the future with, and since I'd proven rather adept at living on nothing, she felt I didn't need any of it. I had a bright future earning money; she did not, she reasoned. I'm certain Hank, the new husband, was filling her ear full of financial advice. Our paths will cross again one day, mine and Hank's.

    I will finish law school in May, a month from now, then I'll sit for the bar exam in July. I will not graduate with honors, though I'm somewhere in the top half of my class. The only smart thing I've done in three years of law school was to schedule the required and difficult courses early, so I could goof off in this, my last semester. My classes this spring are a joke: Sports Law, Art Law, Selected Readings from the Napoleonic Code and, my favorite, Legal Problems of the Elderly.

    It is this last selection that has me sitting here in a rickety chair behind a flimsy folding table in a hot, damp, metal building filled with an odd assortment of seniors, as they like to be called. A hand
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 608
Erscheinungsdatum 01.02.1996
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-440-22165-4
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 17,4/10,6/3,1 cm
Gewicht 302 g
Verkaufsrang 24674
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
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Spannend!
von Verena Thye aus Rheine am 09.04.2013
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Rudy Baylor ist Jurastudent und steht kurz vor dem Examen, der erste Job nach dem Studium scheint sicher. Da er bereits die schwierigen Kurse zu Beginn des Studiums belegt hat, verbleiben ihm im letzten Semester nur noch wenige leichte Veranstaltungen, wie die kostenlose Rechtsberatung in einem Altersheim. Hier lernt er Dot und ... Rudy Baylor ist Jurastudent und steht kurz vor dem Examen, der erste Job nach dem Studium scheint sicher. Da er bereits die schwierigen Kurse zu Beginn des Studiums belegt hat, verbleiben ihm im letzten Semester nur noch wenige leichte Veranstaltungen, wie die kostenlose Rechtsberatung in einem Altersheim. Hier lernt er Dot und Buddy Black kennen, die Eltern des Leukämiekranken Donny Ray. Dieser benötigt dringend eine Knochenmarktransplantation, die die Versicherung jedoch nicht übernehmen möchte. Als ihm die versprochene Stelle gestrichen wird, bleibt ihm noch dieser Fall…

Die Spannung bleibt im Gerichtsgebäude
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus München am 12.09.2011

Nach langer Zeit wollte ich mal wieder einen Grisham lesen und haben mir the rainmaker zugelegt. Das Buch handelt von einem sehr jungen Anwalt, der gerade seine Prüfungen bestanden hat und eher durch Zufall an den Fall des leukämieerkrankten Donny Ray gerät. Es ist sein erster großer Fall und verspricht Millionen. Es ist das bek... Nach langer Zeit wollte ich mal wieder einen Grisham lesen und haben mir the rainmaker zugelegt. Das Buch handelt von einem sehr jungen Anwalt, der gerade seine Prüfungen bestanden hat und eher durch Zufall an den Fall des leukämieerkrankten Donny Ray gerät. Es ist sein erster großer Fall und verspricht Millionen. Es ist das bekannte Spiel Gut gegen Böse und zeigt sicherlich auch schonungslos das verkommene Gesundheitssystem in den USA, in welchem einem nicht geholfen wird, wenn man keine Versicherung hat und selbst wenn man eine hat, es nicht unbedingt die Rettung ist. Leider schafft es Grisham nicht die Spannung aufzubauen, die ich mir gewünscht habe, das Buch liest sich jedoch ganz gut weg, vor allem die Personen Miss Birdie, Richter Kippler und Deck erzeugen den ein oder anderen Schmunzler. Viel Spaß