Meine Filiale

Moby-Dick

Or, the Whale

Herman Melville

(3)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
17,99
17,99
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
Erscheint demnächst (Nachdruck) Versandkostenfrei
Erscheint demnächst (Nachdruck)
Versandkostenfrei
Für diesen Artikel gilt unsere Vorbesteller-Preisgarantie

Weitere Formate

Taschenbuch

ab 2,99 €

Accordion öffnen

gebundene Ausgabe

ab 7,19 €

Accordion öffnen

eBook

ab 0,49 €

Accordion öffnen

Hörbuch

ab 12,19 €

Accordion öffnen
  • Moby Dick

    Digital (2015)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    12,19 €

    Digital (2015)
  • Moby Dick

    CD (2015)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    14,09 €

    CD (2015)
  • Moby Dick

    CD (2018)

    Lieferbar in 1 - 2 Wochen

    16,19 €

    CD (2018)
  • Moby Dick

    Digital (2015)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    19,99 €

    Digital (2015)
  • Moby Dick (Spanish Edition)

    Digital (2018)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    19,99 €

    Digital (2018)
  • Moby Dick

    CD (2006)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    21,99 €

    CD (2006)
  • Moby Dick

    CD (2007)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    24,99 €

    CD (2007)
  • Moby Dick

    Digital (2018)

    Lieferbar in 1 - 2 Wochen

    29,99 €

    Digital (2018)
  • Moby-Dick

    CD (2009)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    38,99 €

    CD (2009)
  • Moby-Dick

    Digital (2009)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    61,99 €

    Digital (2009)
  • Moby-Dick

    CD (2009)

    Lieferbar innerhalb von 3 Wochen

    146,99 €

    CD (2009)

Hörbuch-Download

ab 2,99 €

Accordion öffnen

Beschreibung

Part of Penguin's beautiful hardcover Clothbound Classics series, designed by the award-winning Coralie Bickford-Smith, these delectable and collectible editions are bound in high-quality, tactile cloth with foil stamped into the design.

In part, Moby-Dick is the story of an eerily compelling madman pursuing an unholy war against a creature as vast and dangerous and unknowable as the sea itself. But more than just a novel of adventure, more than an encyclopedia of whaling lore and legend, Moby-Dick is a haunting, mesmerizing, and important social commentary populated with several of the most unforgettable and enduring characters in literature. Written with wonderfully redemptive humor, Moby-Dick is a profound and timeless inquiry into character, faith, and the nature of perception.

This edition contains the definitive text of Moby-Dick based on the Northwestern-Newberry edition. It also features an introduction by Andrew Delbanco and explanatory commentary by Tom Quirk.

For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Winner of the 2012 Fifty Books/Fifty Covers show, organized by Design Observer in association with AIGA and Designers & Books

Winner of the 2014 Type Directors Club Communication Design Award

Praise for Penguin Drop Caps:

"[Penguin Drop Caps] convey a sense of nostalgia for the tactility and aesthetic power of a physical book and for a centuries-old tradition of beautiful lettering."
- Fast Company

"Vibrant, minimalist new typographic covers.... Bonus points for the heartening gender balance of the initial selections."
-Maria Popova, Brain Pickings

"The Penguin Drop Caps series is a great example of the power of design. Why buy these particular classics when there are less expensive, even free editions of Great Expectations ? Because they're beautiful objects. Paul Buckley and Jessica Hische's fresh approach to the literary classics reduces the design down to typography and color. Each cover is foil-stamped with a cleverly illustrated letterform that reveals an element of the story. Jane Austen's A ( Pride and Prejudice ) is formed by opulent peacock feathers and Charlotte Bronte's B ( Jane Eyre ) is surrounded by flames. The complete set forms a rainbow spectrum prettier than anything else on your bookshelf."
-Rex Bonomelli, The New York Times

"Drool-inducing."
- Flavorwire

"Classic reads in stunning covers-your book club will be dying."
- Redbook

Herman Melville was born on August 1, 1819, in New York City, the son of a merchant. Only twelve when his father died bankrupt, young Herman tried work as a bank clerk, as a cabin boy on a trip to Liverpool, and as an elementary schoolteacher, before shipping in January 1841 on the whaler Acushnet, bound for the Pacific. Deserting ship the following year in the Marquesas, he made his way to Tahiti and Honolulu, returning as an ordinary seaman on the frigate United States to Boston, where he was discharged in October 1844. Books based on these adventures won him immediate success. By 1850 he was married, had acquired a farm near Pittsfield, Massachussetts (where he was the impetuous friend and neighbor of Nathaniel Hawthorne), and was hard at work on his masterpiece Moby-Dick. Literary success soon faded; his complexity increasingly alienated readers. After a visit to the Holy Land in January 1857, he turned from writing prose fiction to poetry. In 1863, during the Civil War, he moved back to New York City, where from 1866 to1885 he was a deputy inspector in the Custom House, and where, on September 28, 1891, he died. A draft of a final prose work, Billy Budd, Sailor, was left unfinished and uncollated; packed tidily away by his widow, it was not rediscovered and published until 1924.

Andrew Delbanco was born in 1952. Educated at Harvard, he has lectured extensively throughout the United States and abroad. In 2001, Time named him "America's Best Social Critic” and in 2011 he was awarded a National Humanities Medal. Two of his previous works, The Puritan Ordeal and Melville: His World and Work received the Lionel Trilling Book Award at Columbia University, where he is Director of American Studies and Julian Clarence Levi Professor in the Humanities. He lives in New York City with his wife and two children.

Tom Quirk is Catherine Paine Middlebush Professor of English at the University of Missouri-Columbia. He is the editor of the Penguin Classics editions of Mark Twain's Tales, Speeches, Essays, and Sketches (1994) and Ambrose Bierce's Tales of Soldiers and Civilians and Other Stories (2000) and co-editor of The Portable American Realism Reader (1997). His recent books include Nothing Abstract: Investigations in the American Literary Imagination (2001) and Mark Twain and Human Nature (2007).

Coralie Bickford-Smith is an award-winning designer at Penguin Books (U.K.), where she has created several highly acclaimed series designs. She studied typography at Reading University and lives in London.

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 720
Erscheinungsdatum 24.11.2015
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-14-119960-3
Verlag Penguin Books Ltd
Maße (L/B/H) 20,6/13,7/4,6 cm
Gewicht 846 g
Abbildungen 1 B&W MAP 6 B&W ILLUSTRATIONS
Illustrator Coralie Bickford-Smith
Verkaufsrang 13195

Kundenbewertungen

Durchschnitt
3 Bewertungen
Übersicht
0
0
0
2
1

Falsche Sprache
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Mülligen am 26.12.2012
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Leider ist explizit angegeben, das die Sprache dieses Buches DEUTSCH ist! Das ist leider nicht der Fall, es handelt sich um die englische Originalversion. Das ist auch nicht schlecht, aber eben nicht das was ich hier kaufen wollte. Gut das Lehrgeld ist nicht wirklich hoch, aber es ist und bleibt Etikettenschwindel!

Falsche Sprache
von Tompkins am 29.11.2012
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Diese Bewertung bezieht sich nicht auf den Inhalt des Buches, sondern auf die irreführende Auszeichnung. Ich habe dieses Buch für meinen Sohn heruntergeladen, da angebeben war, dass es sich um eine deutsche Übersetzung handelt. Dieses ist nicht der Fall. Das Buch ist in Englisch! Bei dem Preis, läßt sich das verschmerzen, dennoc... Diese Bewertung bezieht sich nicht auf den Inhalt des Buches, sondern auf die irreführende Auszeichnung. Ich habe dieses Buch für meinen Sohn heruntergeladen, da angebeben war, dass es sich um eine deutsche Übersetzung handelt. Dieses ist nicht der Fall. Das Buch ist in Englisch! Bei dem Preis, läßt sich das verschmerzen, dennoch sollte auf die Auszeichnung Verlass sein.

Ziemlich langatmig
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 28.02.2012
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Wer sich auf einen spannenden, leicht lesbaren Abenteuerroman freut, ist mit Melvilles „Moby Dick“ nicht gut beraten. Auf den ersten 500 Seiten ist von Kaptain Ahab wenig zu hören und von Moby Dick nichts zu sehen. Stattdessen ergeht sich der Erzähler in seitenlangen Ausschweifungen etwa über die Schönheit der Schwanzflosse, wid... Wer sich auf einen spannenden, leicht lesbaren Abenteuerroman freut, ist mit Melvilles „Moby Dick“ nicht gut beraten. Auf den ersten 500 Seiten ist von Kaptain Ahab wenig zu hören und von Moby Dick nichts zu sehen. Stattdessen ergeht sich der Erzähler in seitenlangen Ausschweifungen etwa über die Schönheit der Schwanzflosse, widmet sich der physiognomischen Frage, ob der Pottwal ein Gesicht habe, und verfolgt die historischen Spuren des Wals. Schon interessanter sind seine detaillierten Beschreibungen der Gerätschaften des Walfangs, des Ablaufs der Jagd sowie einige Anekdoten zum Verhalten der Pottwale. Jegliche „wissenschaftlichen“ Erkenntnisse und biologischen Kategorisierungen, die der Erzähler aufführt, müssen jedoch im zeitlichen Rahmen der Erzählung betrachtet werden. So ordnet er beispielsweise den Wal den Fischen und nicht den Säugetieren zu. Die Sprache Melvilles ist eigentlich recht einnehmend, aber die Story schleppt so langsam dahin, dass ich Mühe hatte, das Buch zu Ende zu lesen.


  • Artikelbild-0
  • Call me Ishmael. This resonant opening of Moby-Dick, the greatest novel in American literature, announces the narrator, Herman Melville, as he with a measure of slyness thought of himself. In the Scriptures Ishmael, a wild man sired by the overwhelming patriarch Abraham, was nevertheless the bastard son of a serving girl Hagar. The author himself was the offspring of two distinguished American families, the Melvilles of Boston and the Gansevoorts of Albany.

    Melville's father cast something of a blight on the family escutcheon by his tendency to bankruptcy which passed down to his son. Dollars damn me, the son was to say over and over. When he sat down in the green landscape of Pittsfield, Massachusetts, to compose Moby-Dick he was in debt, the father of one son, and another to be born a few days after the publication of the novel in England.

    Melville had published five novels previous to Moby-Dick; the first two did well, and then with the capriciousness of the public the subsequent novels failed to please. He was a known literary figure with a fading reputation. How he came upon the courage to undertake the challenging creation of the epical battle between a sea creature, a white whale called Moby Dick, and an old captain from Nantucket by the name of Ahab is one of literature's triumphant mysteries. Add to that, as one reads, that he was only thirty-two years old.

    Ten years before, in 1841, he had signed up as a common seaman on the whaling vessel Acushnet bound for the South Seas. Young Ishmael was drawn by the lure of the sea and by the wonder of the whale itself, the Leviathan, the monarch of the deep, "one grand hooded phantom, like a snow hill in the air." Until the discovery of petroleum oil in 1859 and Thomas Edison's invention of the incandescent lamp in 1879, whaling was a major commercial occupation in New England. Fortunes were made, grand houses were built, often with a "widow's walk" on the roof that testified to the great dangers of the enterprise. For the crew, service on a whaler was a drastic life of unremitting labor; foul, crowded quarters; bad food in scanty servings; contractual terms for years at miserable wages; brutalized companions picked up from all the ports of the world; tyrannical captains practicing a "sultanism" which Melville abhorred. A ship afloat is after all a prison. Melville was on three whalers in his four years at sea and from each, as we read in Typee and Omoo, the struggle is to escape, as he did when the boats anchored near exotic islands. He wrote about the misery of the whaling life, but not about whaling itself until he came to Moby-Dick. His imaginary whaler, the Pequod, death bound as it is, would be called, for an ordinary seaman, an agreeable berth. Ahab has no interest left beyond his internal struggle with one whale.

    Still, there is whaling, the presumption of it. When a whale is sighted small boats are detached from the main vessel and the men engage in a deadly battle to try to match, with flying harpoons, the whale's immense strength and desperation. If the great thing is captured, the deck of the main ship becomes an abattoir of blood and guts. The thick blubber is to be stripped, the huge head to be drained of its oils for soothing ambergris, for candles; the bones of the carcass make their way into corsets and umbrellas and scrimshaw trinkets. Moby-Dick is a history of cetology, an encylopedic telling of the qualities of the fin-back, the right whale, the hyena whale, the sperm whale, the killer whale, classified by size in mock academic form as folio, octavo, and so on.

    Information about a vanished world is one thing, but, above all else, this astonishing book is a human tragedy of almost supernatural suspensiveness, written in a rushing flow of imaginative language, poetical intensity, metaphor and adjective of consuming beauty. It begins on the cobbled streets of New Bedford, where Ishmael is to spend a few days before boarding t