Warenkorb
 

Moby-Dick

Drop Caps

(3)

Weitere Formate

eBook

Taschenbuch

From A to Z, the Penguin Drop Caps series collects 26 unique hardcovers—featuring cover art by Jessica Hische

It all begins with a letter. Fall in love with Penguin Drop Caps, a new series of twenty-six collectible and hardcover editions, each with a type cover showcasing a gorgeously illustrated letter of the alphabet. In a design collaboration between Jessica Hische and Penguin Art Director Paul Buckley, the series features unique cover art by Hische, a superstar in the world of type design and illustration, whose work has appeared everywhere from Tiffany & Co. to Wes Anderson's recent film Moonrise Kingdom to Penguin's own bestsellers Committed and Rules of Civility. With exclusive designs that have never before appeared on Hische's hugely popular Daily Drop Cap blog, the Penguin Drop Caps series debuted with an 'A' for Jane Austen's Pride and Prejudice, a 'B' for Charlotte Brönte's Jane Eyre, and a 'C' for Willa Cather's My Ántonia. It continues with more perennial classics, perfect to give as elegant gifts or to showcase on your own shelves.

M is for Melville, who wrote of his masterpiece, "It is the horrible texture of a fabric that should be woven of ships' cables and hawsers. A Polar wind blows through it, and birds of prey hover over it." In part, Moby-Dick is the story of an eerily compelling madman pursuing an unholy war against a creature as vast and dangerous and unknowable as the sea itself. But more than just a novel of adventure, more than an encyclopedia of whaling lore and legend, Moby-Dick is a haunting, mesmerizing, and important social commentary populated with several of the most unforgettable and enduring characters in literature. Written with wonderfully redemptive humor, Moby-Dick is a profound and timeless inquiry into character, faith, and the nature of perception.
Portrait
HERMAN MELVILLE was born in August 1, 1819, in New York City, the son of a merchant. Only twelve when his father died bankrupt, young Herman tried work as a bank clerk, as a cabin-boy on a trip to Liverpool, and as an elementary schoolteacher, before shipping in January 1841 on the whaler Acushnet, bound for the Pacific. Deserting ship the following year in the Marquesas, he made his way to Tahiti and Honolulu, returning as ordinary seaman on the frigate United States to Boston, where he was discharged in October 1844. Books based on these adventures won him immediate success. By 1850 he was married, had acquired a farm near Pittsfield, Massachussetts (where he was the impetuous friend and neighbor of Nathaniel Hawthorne), and was hard at work on his masterpiece Moby-Dick. But literary success soon faded; his complexity increasingly alienated readers. After a visit to the Holy Land in January 1857, he turned from writing prose fiction to poetry. In 1863, during the Civil War, he moved back to New York City, where from 1866-1885 he was a deputy inspector in the Custom House, and where, in 1891, he died. A draft of a final prose work, Billy Budd, Sailor, was left unfinished and uncollated, packed tidily away by his widow, where it remained until its rediscovery and publication in 1924.
JESSICA HISCHE is a letterer, illustrator, typographer, and web designer. She currently serves on the Type Directors Club board of directors, has been named a Forbes Magazine "30 under 30" in art and design as well as an ADC Young Gun and one of Print Magazine's "New Visual Artists". She has designed for Wes Anderson, McSweeney's, Tiffany & Co, Penguin Books and many others. She resides primarily in San Francisco, occasionally in Brooklyn.
… weiterlesen
In den Warenkorb

Beschreibung

Produktdetails


Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 688
Erscheinungsdatum 30.07.2013
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-14-312467-2
Verlag Penguin LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 19,7/14,4/5,1 cm
Gewicht 696 g
Illustrator Jessica Hische
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
18,99
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
Sofort lieferbar
Versandkostenfrei
In den Warenkorb
PAYBACK Punkte
Ihr Feedback zur Seite
Haben Sie alle relevanten Informationen erhalten?
Vielen Dank für Ihr Feedback!
Entschuldigung, beim Absenden Ihres Feedbacks ist ein Fehler passiert. Bitte versuchen Sie es erneut.

Kundenbewertungen

Durchschnitt
3 Bewertungen
Übersicht
0
0
0
2
1

Falsche Sprache
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Mülligen am 26.12.2012
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Leider ist explizit angegeben, das die Sprache dieses Buches DEUTSCH ist! Das ist leider nicht der Fall, es handelt sich um die englische Originalversion. Das ist auch nicht schlecht, aber eben nicht das was ich hier kaufen wollte. Gut das Lehrgeld ist nicht wirklich hoch, aber es ist und... Leider ist explizit angegeben, das die Sprache dieses Buches DEUTSCH ist! Das ist leider nicht der Fall, es handelt sich um die englische Originalversion. Das ist auch nicht schlecht, aber eben nicht das was ich hier kaufen wollte. Gut das Lehrgeld ist nicht wirklich hoch, aber es ist und bleibt Etikettenschwindel!

Falsche Sprache
von Tompkins am 29.11.2012
Bewertet: Format: eBook (ePUB)

Diese Bewertung bezieht sich nicht auf den Inhalt des Buches, sondern auf die irreführende Auszeichnung. Ich habe dieses Buch für meinen Sohn heruntergeladen, da angebeben war, dass es sich um eine deutsche Übersetzung handelt. Dieses ist nicht der Fall. Das Buch ist in Englisch! Bei dem Preis, läßt sich... Diese Bewertung bezieht sich nicht auf den Inhalt des Buches, sondern auf die irreführende Auszeichnung. Ich habe dieses Buch für meinen Sohn heruntergeladen, da angebeben war, dass es sich um eine deutsche Übersetzung handelt. Dieses ist nicht der Fall. Das Buch ist in Englisch! Bei dem Preis, läßt sich das verschmerzen, dennoch sollte auf die Auszeichnung Verlass sein.

Ziemlich langatmig
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 28.02.2012
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Wer sich auf einen spannenden, leicht lesbaren Abenteuerroman freut, ist mit Melvilles „Moby Dick“ nicht gut beraten. Auf den ersten 500 Seiten ist von Kaptain Ahab wenig zu hören und von Moby Dick nichts zu sehen. Stattdessen ergeht sich der Erzähler in seitenlangen Ausschweifungen etwa über die Schönheit der... Wer sich auf einen spannenden, leicht lesbaren Abenteuerroman freut, ist mit Melvilles „Moby Dick“ nicht gut beraten. Auf den ersten 500 Seiten ist von Kaptain Ahab wenig zu hören und von Moby Dick nichts zu sehen. Stattdessen ergeht sich der Erzähler in seitenlangen Ausschweifungen etwa über die Schönheit der Schwanzflosse, widmet sich der physiognomischen Frage, ob der Pottwal ein Gesicht habe, und verfolgt die historischen Spuren des Wals. Schon interessanter sind seine detaillierten Beschreibungen der Gerätschaften des Walfangs, des Ablaufs der Jagd sowie einige Anekdoten zum Verhalten der Pottwale. Jegliche „wissenschaftlichen“ Erkenntnisse und biologischen Kategorisierungen, die der Erzähler aufführt, müssen jedoch im zeitlichen Rahmen der Erzählung betrachtet werden. So ordnet er beispielsweise den Wal den Fischen und nicht den Säugetieren zu. Die Sprache Melvilles ist eigentlich recht einnehmend, aber die Story schleppt so langsam dahin, dass ich Mühe hatte, das Buch zu Ende zu lesen.