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The Restaurant at the End of the Universe

"Douglas Adams is a terrific satirist."-The Washington Post Book World

Facing annihilation at the hands of the warlike Vogons? Time for a cup of tea! Join the cosmically displaced Arthur Dent and his uncommon comrades in arms in their desperate search for a place to eat, as they hurtle across space powered by pure improbability.

Among Arthur's motley shipmates are Ford Prefect, a longtime friend and expert contributor to The Hitchhiker's Guide to the Galaxy; Zaphod Beeblebrox, the three-armed, two-headed ex-president of the galaxy; Tricia McMillan, a fellow Earth refugee who's gone native (her name is Trillian now); and Marvin, the moody android. Their destination? The ultimate hot spot for an evening of apocalyptic entertainment and fine dining, where the food speaks for itself (literally).

"What's such fun is how amusing the galaxy looks through Adams's sardonically silly eyes."-Detroit Free Press
Rezension
"Douglas Adams is a terrific satirist."-Washington Post Book World

"What's such fun is how amusing the galaxy looks through Adams's sardonically silly eyes."-Detroit Free Press

From the Trade Paperback edition.
Portrait
Douglas Adams was born in 1952 and educated at Cambridge. He was the author of five books in the Hitchhiker’s Trilogy, including
The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy; The Restaurant at the End of the Universe
;
Life, the Universe and Everything; So Long, and Thanks for All the Fish
; and

Mostly Harmless
. His other works include
Dirk Gently’s Holistic Detective Agency;
The Long Dark Tea-Time of the Soul;
The Meaning of Liff and

The Deeper Meaning of Liff (with John Lloyd); and
Last Chance to See (with Mark Carwardine). His last book was the bestselling collection,
The Salmon of Doubt, published posthumously in May 2002.

You can find more about Douglas Adam's life and works at douglasadams.com.
… weiterlesen
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  • Chapter 1

    The story so far:

    In the beginning the Universe was created.

    This has made a lot of people very angry and been widely regarded as a bad move.

    Many races believe that it was created by some sort of god, though the Jatravartid people of Viltvodle VI believe that the entire Universe was in fact sneezed out of the nose of a being called the Great Green Arkleseizure.

    The Jatravartids, who live in perpetual fear of the time they call the Coming of the Great White Handkerchief, are small blue creatures with more than fifty arms each, who are therefore unique in being the only race in history to have invented the aerosol deodorant before the wheel.

    However, the Great Green Arkleseizure Theory is not widely accepted outside Viltvodle VI and so, the Universe being the puzzling place it is, other explanations are constantly being sought.

    For instance, a race of hyperintelligent pandimensional beings once built themselves a gigantic supercomputer called Deep Thought to calculate once and for all the Answer to the Ultimate Question of Life, the Universe and Everything.

    For seven and a half million years, Deep Thought computed and calculated, and in the end announced that the answer was in fact Forty-two-and so another, even bigger, computer had to be built to find out what the actual question was.

    And this computer, which was called the Earth, was so large that it was frequently mistaken for a planet-especially by the strange apelike beings who roamed its surface, totally unaware that they were simply part of a gigantic computer program.

    And this is very odd, because without that fairly simple and obvious piece of knowledge, nothing that ever happened on the Earth could possibly make the slightest bit of sense.

    Sadly, however, just before the critical moment of read-out, the Earth was unexpectedly demolished by the Vogons to make way-so they claimed-for a new hyperspace bypass, and so all hope of discovering a meaning for life was lost for ever.

    Or so it would seem.

    Two of these strange, apelike creatures survived.

    Arthur Dent escaped at the very last moment because an old friend of his, Ford Prefect, suddenly turned out to be from a small planet somewhere in the vicinity of Betelgeuse and not from Guildford as he had hitherto claimed; and, more to the point, he knew how to hitch rides on flying saucers.

    Tricia McMillan-or Trillian-had skipped the planet six months earlier with Zaphod Beeblebrox, the then President of the Galaxy.

    Two survivors.

    They are all that remains of the greatest experiment ever conducted-to find the Ultimate Question and the Ultimate Answer of Life, the Universe and Everything.

    And, less than half a million miles from where their starship is drifting lazily through the inky blackness of space, a Vogon ship is moving slowly toward them.

    Chapter 2

    Like all Vogon ships it looked as if it had been not so much designed as congealed. The unpleasant yellow lumps and edifices which protruded from it at unsightly angles would have disfigured the looks of most ships, but in this case that was sadly impossible. Uglier things have been spotted in the skies, but not by reliable witnesses.

    In fact to see anything much uglier than a Vogon ship you would have to go inside it and look at a Vogon. If you are wise, however, this is precisely what you will avoid doing because the average Vogon will not think twice before doing something so pointlessly hideous to you that you will wish you had never been born-or (if you are a clearer minded thinker) that the Vogon had never been born.

    In fact, the average Vogon probably wouldn't even think once. They are simple-minded, thick-willed, slug-brained creatures, and thinking is not really something they are cut out for. Anatomical analysis of the Vogon re
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Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 256
Erscheinungsdatum 01.04.2005
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-0-345-39181-0
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 17,5/10,5/2,2 cm
Gewicht 129 g
Verkaufsrang 11992
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Was beim Hitchhiker fehlte
von Mario Pf. aus Oberösterreich am 10.09.2008
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

The Restaurant at the End of the Universe ist keine schnöde Fortsetzung, denn es war im Grunde bereits als Abschluss des Original-Hitchhikers gedacht, konnte jedoch, typisch für Douglas Adams zur Deadline nicht in diesen integriert werden. Somit wurde aus den fehlenden Kapiteln ein eigenes Buch, was fast prophetisch für die Entw... The Restaurant at the End of the Universe ist keine schnöde Fortsetzung, denn es war im Grunde bereits als Abschluss des Original-Hitchhikers gedacht, konnte jedoch, typisch für Douglas Adams zur Deadline nicht in diesen integriert werden. Somit wurde aus den fehlenden Kapiteln ein eigenes Buch, was fast prophetisch für die Entwicklung der künftigen Trilogie aus fünf Teilen stehen sollte. Das Restaurant am Ende des Universums oder Milliways, ist genau der Ort der im letzten Satz von Per Anhalter durch die Galaxis erwähnt wird und damit fängt man genau dort wieder an wo man aufgehört hat - die Odyssee geht weiter und führt Leser wie Charaktere an das Ende des Universums. Das Restaurant setzt die Geschichte allerdings nicht bloß fort, sondern schreibt sie einfach weiter. Dabei gelingt es Douglas Adams sich mit Wortwitz und herrlichen Humoreinlagen, die den Monty Pythons mehr als ebenbürtig ist, den Vorgänger sogar noch zu übertreffen. Inhaltlich begibt sich Adams nun von der Suche nach dem Sinn des Lebens, auf die Suche nach dem Wesen, das die Galaxis wirklich kontrolliert. Fazit: Wer wissen möchte, ob Marvin noch depressiver und die Galaxis noch skuriller sein kann, der sollte auf "The Restaurant at the End of the Universe" nicht verzichten, auch weil nach dieser gelugenen Fortsetzung, das Niveau des Hitchhikers nur noch von wenigen Bänden der Trilogie in fünf Teilen annähernd erreicht wird.