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Homegoing

A Novel. Nominated for the Dayton Literary Peace Prize for Fiction 2017, Winner of the National Book Critics Circle John Leonard Prize 2016 and the PEN/Hemingway Award for Best First Novel 2017, nominated for the PEN/Robert W. Bingham Prize 2017

Yaa Gyasi

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Beschreibung

Winner of the PEN/ Hemingway Award
Winner of the NBCC's John Leonard Award
Shortlisted for the British Book Award - Debut of the Year
A New York Times Notable Book
A Washington Post Notable Book
One of the Best Books of the Year: NPR, Time, Oprah.com, Harper's Bazaar, San Francisco Chronicle, Mother Jones, Esquire, Elle, Paste, Entertainment Weekly, the Skimm, PopSugar, Minneapolis Star Tribune, BuzzFeed, The Guardian, Financial Times

Ghana, eighteenth century: two half sisters are born into different villages, each unaware of the other. One will marry an Englishman and lead a life of comfort in the palatial rooms of the Cape Coast Castle. The other will be captured in a raid on her village, imprisoned in the very same castle, and sold into slavery.

Homegoing follows the parallel paths of these sisters and their descendants through eight generations: from the Gold Coast to the plantations of Mississippi, from the American Civil War to Jazz Age Harlem. Yaa Gyasi's extraordinary novel illuminates slavery's troubled legacy both for those who were taken and those who stayed-and shows how the memory of captivity has been inscribed on the soul of our nation.

"Homegoing is an inspiration." -Ta-Nehisi Coates

"Spectacular." -Zadie Smith

"Powerful. . . . Compelling. . . . Illuminating." -The Boston Globe

"A blazing success." -Los Angeles Times

"I could not put this book down." -Roxane Gay

"Devastating. . . . Luminous." -Entertainment Weekly

"A beautiful story." -Trevor Noah, The Daily Show

"Spellbinding." -Minneapolis Star Tribune

"Dazzling. . . . Devastating. . . . Truly captivating." -The Washington Post

"Brims with compassion. . . . Yaa Gyasi has given rare and heroic voice to the missing and suppressed." -NPR

"Tremendous . . . Spectacular. . . . Essential reading." -San Francisco Chronicle

"Magical. . . . Hypnotic. . . . Yaa Gyasi [is] a stirringly gifted writer." -The New York Times Book Review

"Powerful. . . . Gyasi has delivered something unbelievably tough to pull off: a centuries-spanning epic of interlinked short stories. . . . She has a poet's ability to pain a scene with a handful of phrases." -The Christian Science Monitor

"Thanks to Ms. Gyasi's instinctive storytelling gifts, the book leaves the reader with a visceral understanding of both the savage realities of slavery and the emotional damage that is handed down, over the centuries. . . . By its conclusion, the characters' tales of loss and resilience have acquired an inexorable and cumulative emotional weight." -The New York Times

"[Toni Morrison's] influence is palpable in Gyasi's historicity and lyricism; she shares Morrison's uncanny ability to crystalize, in a single event, slavery's moral and emotional fallout. . . . No novel has better illustrated the way in which racism became institutionalized in this country." -Vogue

"Gyasi gives voice, and an empathetic ear, to the ensuing seven generations of flawed and deeply human descendants, creating a patchwork mastery of historical fiction." -Elle

"A remarkable feat-a novel at once epic and intimate, capturing the moral weight of history as it bears down on individual struggles, hopes, and fears. A tremendous debut." -Phil Klay, National Book Award-winning author of Redeployment

"Rich. . . . Fascinating. . . . Each chapter is tightly plotted, and there are suspenseful, even spectacular climaxes." -Vulture

"[A] commanding debut . . . will stay with you long after you've finished reading. When people talk about all the things fiction can teach its readers, they're talking about books like this." -Marie Claire

"Homegoing weaves a spectacular epic. . . . Gyasi gives voice not just to a single person or moment, but to a resonant chorus of eight generations." -Los Angeles Review of Books

"Moving. . . . Compelling. . . . Gyasi is an enormously talented writer." -The Dallas Morning News

"I cannot remember the last time I read a novel that made me want to use the adjective perfect. . . . Yaa Gyasi's Homegoing is a feat rarely achieved: a book with the scope of world history and the craft of something much smaller. . . . The cumulative effect is staggering." -Molly McArdle, Brooklyn Magazine

"Carrying on in the tradition of her foremothers-like Toni Morrison, Edwidge Danticat, Assia Djebar and Bessie Head-Gyasi has created a marvelous work of fiction that both embraces and re-writes history." -Paste

"Impressive . . . intricate in plot and scope. . . . Homegoing serves as a modern-day reconstruction of lost and untold narratives-and a desire to move forward." -Miami Herald

"Heart-wrenching . . . . Yaa Gyasi's assured Homegoing is a panorama of splendid
faces." -Atlanta Journal-Constitution

"A remarkable achievement, marking the arrival of a powerful new voice in fiction." -St. Louis Post-Dispatch

"Luminous. . . . The author thrillingly depicts her characters' migrations from mud-hut villages to Harlem's jazz clubs to Ghana's silvered beaches, celebrating how place and fate shape us all." -Oprah.com

"Epic . . . a timely, riveting portrayal of the global African Diaspora-and the aftereffects that li

Yaa Gyasi was born in Ghana and raised in Huntsville, Alabama. She holds a BA in English from Stanford University and an MFA from the Iowa Writers' Workshop, where she held a Dean's Graduate Research Fellowship. She lives in New York City.

Produktdetails

Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 320
Erscheinungsdatum 02.05.2017
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-101-97106-2
Verlag Random House LCC US
Maße (L/B/H) 20,3/13/2,2 cm
Gewicht 233 g
Verkaufsrang 743

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Fesselnde Storyline mit Einblick in die Geschichte Afrikas
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden am 19.06.2019
Bewertet: Einband: Taschenbuch

Die fiktive Story ist sehr spannend gegliedert und nimmt den Leser mit auf eine historische Reise durch das sich entwickelnde Afrika. Die Protagonisten sind komplexe Charaktere und jeder einzelne steht für eine Epoche bzw. einen Zeitpunkt in der Entwicklung Afrikas. Die Autorin schildert ebenfalls das Leben von (nicht nur) junge... Die fiktive Story ist sehr spannend gegliedert und nimmt den Leser mit auf eine historische Reise durch das sich entwickelnde Afrika. Die Protagonisten sind komplexe Charaktere und jeder einzelne steht für eine Epoche bzw. einen Zeitpunkt in der Entwicklung Afrikas. Die Autorin schildert ebenfalls das Leben von (nicht nur) jungen Menschen, welche mit zwei Kulturen aufwachsen und persönliche Hürden, die auf dieser Fusion von Werten und Kulturen und dem sich ständig weiterentwickelndem Umfeld basieren, überwinden müssen. Ein spannendes Buch, welches aufklärt und gleichzeitig einen Denkanstoß gibt und obwohl es größtenteils die Vergangenheit thematisiert auch einen Bezug zur Gegenwart schafft. Extrem Empfehlenswert!

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  • Effia

    The night effia otcher was born into the musky heat of Fanteland, a fire raged through the woods just outside her father's compound. It moved quickly, tearing a path for days. It lived off the air; it slept in caves and hid in trees; it burned, up and through, unconcerned with what wreckage it left behind, until it reached an Asante village. There, it disappeared, becoming one with the night.

    Effia's father, Cobbe Otcher, left his first wife, Baaba, with the new baby so that he might survey the damage to his yams, that most precious crop known far and wide to sustain families. Cobbe had lost seven yams, and he felt each loss as a blow to his own family. He knew then that the memory of the fire that burned, then fled, would haunt him, his children, and his children's children for as long as the line continued. When he came back into Baaba's hut to find Effia, the child of the night's fire, shrieking into the air, he looked at his wife and said, "We will never again speak of what happened today."

    The villagers began to say that the baby was born of the fire, that this was the reason Baaba had no milk. Effia was nursed by Cobbe's second wife, who had just given birth to a son three months before. Effia would not latch on, and when she did, her sharp gums would tear at the flesh around the woman's nipples until she became afraid to feed the baby. Because of this, Effia grew thinner, skin on small birdlike bones, with a large black hole of a mouth that expelled a hungry cry which could be heard throughout the village, even on the days Baaba did her best to smother it, covering the baby's lips with the rough palm of her left hand.

    "Love her," Cobbe commanded, as though love were as simple an act as lifting food up from an iron plate and past one's lips. At night, Baaba dreamed of leaving the baby in the dark forest so that the god Nyame could do with her as he pleased.

    Effia grew older. The summer after her third birthday, Baaba had her first son. The boy's name was Fiifi, and he was so fat that sometimes, when Baaba wasn't looking, Effia would roll him along the ground like a ball. The first day that Baaba let Effia hold him, she accidentally dropped him. The baby bounced on his buttocks, landed on his stomach, and looked up at everyone in the room, confused as to whether or not he should cry. He decided against it, but Baaba, who had been stirring banku, lifted her stirring stick and beat Effia across her bare back. Each time the stick lifted off the girl's body, it would leave behind hot, sticky pieces of banku that burned into her flesh. By the time Baaba had finished, Effia was covered with sores, screaming and crying. From the floor, rolling this way and that on his belly, Fiifi looked at Effia with his saucer eyes but made no noise.

    Cobbe came home to find his other wives attending to Effia's wounds and understood immediately what had happened. He and Baaba fought well into the night. Effia could hear them through the thin walls of the hut where she lay on the floor, drifting in and out of a feverish sleep. In her dream, Cobbe was a lion and Baaba was a tree. The lion plucked the tree from the ground where it stood and slammed it back down. The tree stretched its branches in protest, and the lion ripped them off, one by one. The tree, horizontal, began to cry red ants that traveled down the thin cracks between its bark. The ants pooled on the soft earth around the top of the tree trunk.

    And so the cycle began. Baaba beat Effia. Cobbe beat Baaba. By the time Effia had reached age ten, she could recite a history of the scars on her body. The summer of 1764, when Baaba broke yams across her back. The spring of 1767, when Baaba bashed her left foot with a rock, breaking her big toe so that it now always pointed away from the other toes. For each scar on Effia's body, there was a companion scar on Baaba's, but that didn't stop mother from beating daughter, father from beating