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The Mars Room

(1)
**LONGLISTED FOR THE MAN BOOKER PRIZE 2018**
**THE NEW YORK TIMES BESTSELLER**

'Kushner is one of our most outstanding modern writers.' STYLIST
'More knowing about prison life [than Orange Is The New Black]... so powerful.' NEW YORK TIMES
'Breathtaking.' VOGUE

Romy Hall is at the start of two consecutive life sentences, plus six years, at Stanville Women's Correctional Facility. Outside is the world from which she has been permanently severed: the San Francisco of her youth, changed almost beyond recognition. The Mars Room strip club where she once gave lap dances for a living. And her seven-year-old son, Jackson, now in the care of Romy's estranged mother.

Inside is a new reality to adapt to: thousands of women hustling for the bare essentials needed to survive. The relentlessly deadpan absurdities of institutional living, which Kushner details with humour and precision. Daily acts of violence by guards and prisoners alike. Allegiances formed over liquor brewed in socks, and stories shared through sewage pipes.

Romy sees the future stretch out ahead of her in a long, unwavering line - until news from outside brings a ferocious urgency to her existence, challenging her to escape her own destiny and culminating in a climax of almost unbearable intensity. Through Romy - and through a cast of astonishing characters populating Mars Room - Rachel Kushner presents not just a bold and unsentimental panorama of life on the margins of contemporary America, but an excoriating attack on the prison-industrial complex.
Rezension
"It is an unforgettable novel, and leaves the reader in no doubt that Kushner is one of America's greatest living authors." Daily Telegraph
Portrait
Rachel Kushner’s debut novel,
Telex from Cuba, was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Award and a
New York Times bestseller. Her follow-up novel,
The Flamethrowers, was also a finalist for the National Book Award and received rave reviews on both sides of the Atlantic. Her fiction has appeared in the
New Yorker,
Harper’s and the
Paris Review. She lives in Los Angeles.
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Beschreibung

Produktdetails


Einband Taschenbuch
Seitenzahl 352
Erscheinungsdatum 01.06.2018
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-910702-68-0
Verlag Random House UK
Maße (L/B/H) 23,3/15,1/3 cm
Gewicht 441 g
Buch (Taschenbuch, Englisch)
12,49
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
Sofort lieferbar
Versandkostenfrei
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The Mars Room
von Miss.mesmerized am 14.06.2018
Bewertet: Einband: gebundene Ausgabe

Stanville Women?s Correctional Facility is Romy Hall?s new home, convicted to life sentence. What brought the mother of a young boy to this institution? And how can she cope with the rules that life in prison follows? Romy Hall remembers her life outside, her addiction and most of all... Stanville Women?s Correctional Facility is Romy Hall?s new home, convicted to life sentence. What brought the mother of a young boy to this institution? And how can she cope with the rules that life in prison follows? Romy Hall remembers her life outside, her addiction and most of all The Mars Room where she stripped for a living. This is also where she met the man who was to change her life. Now, her life only consists of surviving, not getting in the way of the leaders or staff who have their own laws behind the bars. Life inside mirrors the outside, there are ruling classes and those ruled. And sometimes both spheres interact ? often not for the better. Rachel Kushner paints a blunt picture of life inside a prison. The idea of such a place as somewhere you can become a better person and atone for your wrongdoings is far from what she describes. It is a constant struggle of surviving and of adapting to the unwritten laws. Life is a series of disappointments, visitors who never come, news which do not reach you. And outside, there isn?t much waiting for you either. It wasn?t that easy for me to sympathise with the protagonist Romy. This might be due to her role; even though she is inside, she remains an observer somehow. At the same time, there is so much unsaid about her that makes it difficult to form a whole picture of her. The fact that the reason for her imprisonment isn?t given immediately, on the other hand, adds to the underlying suspense of the novel. Slowly you get closer to the culminating point which reveals what happened. Additionally, the other characters are, obviously, those at the margins of society, people you wouldn?t actually socialise with and which sometimes repel you as a reader. What I really liked is Kushner?s style of writing. The protagonist?s narration flows like a stream of consciousness which makes it quite realistic and lively. Furthermore, she often hints at what is to come without saying too much, just enough to arouse your interest. When Romy talks about her life and most of all about her future, she is quite direct ? well, there isn?t much reason to embellish anything and therefore, her words sound absolutely authentic.