The Business of War

Inhaltsverzeichnis

Introduction; Part I. Foundations and Expansion: 1. Military resources for hire, 1450-1560; 2. The expansion of military enterprise, 1560-1620; 3. Diversity and adaptation: military enterprise during the Thirty Years' War; Part II. Operations and Structures: 4. The military contractor at war; 5. The business of war; 6. Continuity, transformation and rhetoric in European warfare after 1650; Conclusion.

The Business of War

Military Enterprise and Military Revolution in Early Modern Europe

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Beschreibung

"This is a major new approach to the military revolution and the relationship between warfare and the power of the state in early modern Europe. Whereas previous accounts have emphasised the growth of state-run armies during this period, David Parrott argues instead that the delegation of military responsibility to sophisticated and extensive networks of private enterprise reached unprecedented levels. This included not only the hiring of troops but their equipping, the supply of food and munitions, and the financing of their operations. The book reveals the extraordinary prevalence and capability of private networks of commanders, suppliers, merchants and financiers who managed the conduct of war on land and at sea, challenging the traditional assumption that reliance on mercenaries and the private sector results in corrupt and inefficient military force. In so doing, the book provides essential historical context to contemporary debates about the role of the private sector in warfare"--

David Parrott is a Fellow and Lecturer at New College, University of Oxford. His previous books include Richelieu's Army: War, Government and Society in France, 1624-1642 (Cambridge University Press, 2001).

'David Parrott's sparkling and deeply-considered study is a seminal contribution to the history of warfare and government in all periods, and reveals that 'military outsourcing' was normal long before the Iraq War brought it into the headlines. Highly original in argument and notably lively in presentation, it will become a modern classic.' Hamish Scott, University of Glasgow 'David Parrott deftly explores the various shades of grey in the public private partnership between early modern state and military entrepreneurs. He proves that more often than not private enterprise simply did perform more efficiently than the state.' Lothar Hobelt, University of Vienna 'This splendid survey prompts many further questions ... but the history of early modern warfare will never look the same again.' History Today

Details

Einband

Taschenbuch

Erscheinungsdatum

29.02.2016

Verlag

Cambridge University Press

Seitenzahl

448

Beschreibung

Details

Einband

Taschenbuch

Erscheinungsdatum

29.02.2016

Verlag

Cambridge University Press

Seitenzahl

448

Maße (L/B/H)

22,9/15,2/2,4 cm

Gewicht

644 g

Sprache

Englisch

ISBN

978-0-521-73558-2

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Die Leseprobe wird geladen.
  • The Business of War
  • Introduction; Part I. Foundations and Expansion: 1. Military resources for hire, 1450-1560; 2. The expansion of military enterprise, 1560-1620; 3. Diversity and adaptation: military enterprise during the Thirty Years' War; Part II. Operations and Structures: 4. The military contractor at war; 5. The business of war; 6. Continuity, transformation and rhetoric in European warfare after 1650; Conclusion.