Meine Filiale

Sorcery of Thorns

Margaret Rogerson

(6)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
Buch (gebundene Ausgabe, Englisch)
12,99
12,99
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
inkl. gesetzl. MwSt.
Lieferbar innerhalb von 6 Wochen Versandkostenfrei
Lieferbar innerhalb von 6 Wochen
Versandkostenfrei

Weitere Formate

Taschenbuch

9,49 €

Accordion öffnen

gebundene Ausgabe

12,99 €

Accordion öffnen

eBook (ePUB)

8,85 €

Accordion öffnen

Beschreibung

A New York Times bestseller!

“A bewitching gem...I absolutely loved every moment of this story.” —Stephanie Garber, #1 New York Times bestselling author of the Caraval series

“If you loved the Hogwarts Library…you’ll be right at home at Summershall.” —Katherine Arden, New York Times bestselling author of The Bear and the Nightingale

From the New York Times bestselling author of An Enchantment of Ravens comes an “enthralling adventure” (Kirkus Reviews, starred review) about an apprentice at a magical library who must battle a powerful sorcerer to save her kingdom.

All sorcerers are evil. Elisabeth has known that as long as she has known anything. Raised as a foundling in one of Austermeer’s Great Libraries, Elisabeth has grown up among the tools of sorcery—magical grimoires that whisper on shelves and rattle beneath iron chains. If provoked, they transform into grotesque monsters of ink and leather.

Then an act of sabotage releases the library’s most dangerous grimoire, and Elisabeth is implicated in the crime. With no one to turn to but her sworn enemy, the sorcerer Nathaniel Thorn, and his mysterious demonic servant, she finds herself entangled in a centuries-old conspiracy. Not only could the Great Libraries go up in flames, but the world along with them.

As her alliance with Nathaniel grows stronger, Elisabeth starts to question everything she’s been taught—about sorcerers, about the libraries she loves, even about herself. For Elisabeth has a power she has never guessed, and a future she could never have imagined.

Produktdetails

Einband gebundene Ausgabe
Seitenzahl 464
Altersempfehlung 12 - 99 Jahr(e)
Erscheinungsdatum 01.06.2019
Sprache Englisch
ISBN 978-1-4814-9761-9
Verlag Simon + Schuster
Maße (L/B/H) 23,6/16,4/4,5 cm
Gewicht 633 g
Verkaufsrang 686

Buchhändler-Empfehlungen

Libraries, sorcerers and demons

Elisabeth Preininger, Thalia-Buchhandlung Dresden

"Sorcery of Thorns" tells the magical story of young librarian apprentice Elisabeth Scrivener, who witnesses a tragic murder in the library of grimoires where she lives. As a suspect in the affair, she is expected to give evidence to the Magisterium, the political institution for sorcerers. From that moment on, her life is in danger. The exciting story about the grimoires (books that include magical spells), sorcery and demons had me hooked from page one until the very last sentence of this stand alone.

Kundenbewertungen

Durchschnitt
6 Bewertungen
Übersicht
3
2
1
0
0

Fun
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Wien am 28.05.2020

A little slow in the beginning but otherwise a very fun read, I liked it a lot!

Klare Empfehlung!
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Pfeffingen am 17.04.2020

Es ist wirklich schade, dass Sorcery of Thorns ein Einzelband ist, denn ich habe einfach alles daran geliebt und hätte gerne mehr von alldem! Zum Einen bin ich begeistert von der Idee mit den Büchern, die sich in Monster verwandeln können und daher in diesen grossen Bibliotheken aufbewahrt und bewacht werden. Margaret Rogerson ... Es ist wirklich schade, dass Sorcery of Thorns ein Einzelband ist, denn ich habe einfach alles daran geliebt und hätte gerne mehr von alldem! Zum Einen bin ich begeistert von der Idee mit den Büchern, die sich in Monster verwandeln können und daher in diesen grossen Bibliotheken aufbewahrt und bewacht werden. Margaret Rogerson beschreibt das gesamte Konzept sehr verständlich, auf mich wirkte alles durchdacht und logisch. Anfangs war ich nicht so begeistert davon, dass die dritte Person singular verwendet wird, die Geschichte aber nur aus Elisabeths Perspektive und keiner anderen erzählt wird, aber ich gewöhnte mich daran und letztendlich hat es diese ganze Atmosphäre unterstützt und zur Geschichte gepasst. Ich begleitete Elisabeth sehr gerne durch dieses Buch hindurch, da ihre Gefühle und Gedankengänge sehr authentisch geschildert wurden, wodurch ich mich gut in sie hineinversetzen konnte. Selbst wenn sie einmal falsch lag, konnte ich immer nachvollziehen weshalb sie so dachte oder handelte, weil deutlich gemacht wurde, wovon sie in ihrem Leben bereits beeinflusst und geprägt worden war. Auch die Nebencharaktere waren sehr interessante Persönlichkeiten. Wer nun gut und wer böse war, konnte ich nicht immer erkennen, was das Ganze umso interessanter machte! Teilweise ist diese Frage bis zum Schluss nicht beantwortet worden, aber ich mochte die Weise, wie diese Geschichte endete, denn Margaret Rogerson zeigte die unterschiedlichen Facetten der jeweiligen Figuren, woraus man sich letztendlich ein eigenes Bild machen konnte. Diese gesamte Geschichte war einzigartig! Es war einmal etwas anderes und ich konnte den Verlauf nur sehr selten vorhersehen. Das einzige was ich mir noch gewünscht hätte, wäre eine detaillierte Karte gewesen, da ich ein wenig Schwierigkeiten hatte, mir die einzelnen Orte als Ganzes vorzustellen. FAZIT Ich habe die Zeit mit diesem Buch sehr geniessen können! Die Geschichte, deren Verlauf, die gesamte Atmosphäre und die Welt, in der sich das Ganze abspielte waren einmal etwas anderes und neues und ich wurde immer wieder überrascht. Die Figuren wurden alle sehr einzigartig beschrieben und ich mochte die Art, wie Margaret Rogerson es der Leserschaft überlässt, bei gewissen Figuren selbst zu entscheiden, ob sie nun gut oder böse sind.

Great potential but poor execution
von einer Kundin/einem Kunden aus Wedel am 19.10.2019

Reviewing this book proves quite difficult due to my mixed feelings. Maybe I should first go into what I liked about it: First of all, the idea for the Great Libraries and the grimoires as books with a personality and soul really intrigued me. It reminded me a bit of “City of Dreaming Books” by Walter Moers and I quite love i... Reviewing this book proves quite difficult due to my mixed feelings. Maybe I should first go into what I liked about it: First of all, the idea for the Great Libraries and the grimoires as books with a personality and soul really intrigued me. It reminded me a bit of “City of Dreaming Books” by Walter Moers and I quite love it. Secondly, the character of Silas was outstanding. He was immensely interesting and I fell in love with him immediately. Seriously, I would die for him. The general plotting wasn’t bad as well and actually could have turned out brilliantly, if the pacing and the other characters would have been more convincing. So now to the things I didn’t enjoy: First of all, it’s yet another book to add to the pile of YA books taking their inspiration for world-building from the 18/19 hundreds and throwing their female protagonist into a misogynistic world in which women are not taken seriously and treated poorly because the authors are utterly uncreative and can’t think of a way to create struggles for female characters other than their gender. I’m so tired of reading about sexist worlds. I’m reading for escapism and I don’t need all the **** I have to deal with in real life in my books too. Please YA authors, be a bit more creative and create new worlds and original struggles for the characters that are not grounded on sexism because that’s just frustrating and agitating. Secondly, how can you create such a beautiful demonic character as Silas, give him and the bi male lead Nathaniel such great chemistry and then make them not fall in love with each other?! What in the heavens is wrong with all the YA authors who don’t see the true potential for a romance just because it’s not straight? Silas and Nathaniel would have made such an interesting and healthy and beautiful couple. I’m literally crying over this lost opportunity. I mean Silas has been in love with Nathan and Nathan was bi… so what did stop the author with going through with it? It would have made such a great impact on YA fantasy in general and could have been kind of a predecessor for a new kind of YA books rising against stereotypes. And last but certainly not least, I strongly disliked the humor in the book. It felt forced, juvenile and cringy. There was this scene for example, in which they were fighting to rescue the world from being torn apart and suddenly made a playful remark or joked around and it was so cataclysmic to what was happening in the story that it destroyed any urgency and seriousness. So all in all, the story had a lot of potential, great ideas and a marvelous demonic character but failed to reach its potential in the execution.


  • Artikelbild-0